Posts tagged Water

Flammable Water

The sight of flammable drinking water is affecting a Colorado couple. The couple says that a nearby natural gas well has been leaking into their drinking water well. This is causing their drinking water to be flammable. Stories like this one are on the rise as water becomes increasingly polluted. This event should bring light to the United States drinking water problem. The problem is that as companies pollute the environment around them, they also end up polluting a valuable resource, water. A resource so valuable we can’t live without it, yet we continue our progress towards polluting our nations water supplies.

Sam G.

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Raising Awareness of Water Privatization

The possibility of raising awareness about water privatization was brought up as we discussed options for next term’s project.  I would be interested in doing some volunteer work, or creating a campaign to draw more attention to this subject in the Portland area.  It is not ethical for companies such as Nestle to be taking the world’s water and selling it back to people who should have access to clean free water anyways.  These types of companies are weakening the water quality and leaving millions of people with a contaminated water source.  A point was brought up about a future possibility to sell air in a plastic bottle, since that is essentially how many people chose to consume their water… in a plastic bottle.  If we could create a campaign of some sort around this topic, I think that would be fun and make a difference around the PSU campus.  We could even start a petition to ban the sale of water bottles on campus, and somehow get more hydration stations around.  A fundraiser could help complete that goal.

-Erica Nickerson

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Saving Water

After discussing all of the issues this planet has with losing water the past few weeks in class, I thought it might be a good idea to read up on how to conserve water in our lives. This article gives 100 ways to save water, some of them are pretty obvious but sometimes we need a little reminder on the little things. Just give this list a once over so you can save your wallet and the waters.

~Cody Males

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Should Washington State raise its tax on Hazardous Materials?

This articles poses a good follow up to the Frontline episode we recently watched, Poisoned Waters.  What do you think?  Discuss.

– Jacob

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All Things Considered: The Mekong River Delta

On my way home from school, I turned on NPR and heard this piece about the Mekong River.   I guess they are going to do a week-long special on the river and felt that, after today’s presentation, there might be some people interested in learning more. Here’s the first installment, check it out.

– Jacob

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How clean is your bowl?

Toilets flush more than our own waste, and in efforts to clean people often kill beneficial organisms and poison waterways.  It is a common misconception that a toilet bowl must smell like flowers and have blue water.  However, blue toilets mean nothing and they actually create problems for the environment.  Many toilet cleaning products have chlorine, ammonia and hydrochloric acid as ingredients, which kills bacteria that breaks down waste.  There are many more dangerous chemicals to clean toilet bowls that are environmentally damaging.  Often these chemicals are not removed water treatment facilities.

Instead, to keep your toilet clean, the regular use of a toilet brush will only takes a few seconds to do each day.  You can also use baking soda or vinegar to get a good clean feeling.  Thanks to help from this site.

-Erica Nickerson

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Bottled Water Out of the Tap

Recently in class we were discussing bottled water vs. tap water and, correct me if I’m wrong, a good portion of the class agreed that there was essentially no difference and that Portland’s tap water “is great” and “some of the best” put by Jacob.  It was also brought up, in disgust I might add, that some companies even bottle water straight from the tap.  Well I don’t disagree that there is worse water out there than Portland and I’m not saying that I know the properties and makeup of water, but I do know that Portland does not have great tap water. 

I know this because I grew up in the small town of Culver, Oregon, having a population of about 1400 people and a high school of fewer than 250 students.  How does this have anything to do with water?  Simple, Culver is home to Opal Springs. Our unpurified tap water, which is also piped to Metolious and Madras, is the same water bottled at a company called Earth2o and shipped to places all over the Pacific Northwest.  The water that I showered in and flushed the toilet with for more than 18 years was better than the water you Portlanders have ever tasted from the tap. I dare say it is really some of the best water in the world. 

So the next time you decide to take a break from the same old, nasty Portland water, grab a bottle of Earth2o and support the small community of Culver, Oregon and experience what I did everyday for 18 years.

Nevin Lewis

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Is global warming making it harder to be “green”?

Scientist at the University of Washington are currently studying the effects of global warming on hydro powered dams. These scientist are finding that a warming of around two degrees would result in a twenty five percent decrease in hydro dams electricity yield. The problem is that as temperature increases water levels will peak earlier causing summer water levels to be significantly lower. This decrease in water makes this “green” technology less efficient. Unfortunately this decrease in water would also cause problems for the salmon. Scientist are working on a system that would supplement the rivers with stored water through the dry months. I feel this report will make hydro power a lot less popular to companies.

Sam G.

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The Miracles of ZamZam Water!

         Do you know what ZamZam water is? It is water! However, this water (for me) is totally different from any water that I have ever drunk. I have been drinking this water since I was born, but when I came to the U.S, it was one of the important things that I miss from my country. And since this term is all about water, I decide to take advantage of the theme and share with you this unique water. It comes from a well that is called ZamZam (that’s why it’s called ZamZam), and it is located in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. and even though the well is in the middle of the desert, it has never dried up. This water has both scientific and religious values. It may be hard to explain the religious value of it, but one can look up the story of ZamZam water that may help clarifying its importance. However, there are lots of scientific discoveries that one may not find them in any kind of water.   It has an amount of calcium, magnesium, and fluoride that help refresh the body and the brain. Also, one of the miracles of ZamZam water is its ability to satisfy both thirst and hunger. This water has never been chemically treated or chlorinated.

          In the 1970, there were some untrue statements that have been said about ZamZam water as being not good for drinking. However, a group of researchers have proved that it is fit for drinking. This is the article that has the whole story, how they proved it and what they discovered. In fact, the more you explore, the more wonders surface and you find yourself believing implicitly in the miracles of this water.

Needa L

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Carbon Rocks.

I read an article that wrote about a possible solution for the planets high level of carbon emissions.  It stated that researchers are now considering pumping the carbon into rocks under the sea.  The idea is that power plants will be set up to a ‘carbon sink’ which will lead to the underwater rocks.  It was written that this is “the ultimate repository”.  This idea of putting carbon into underwater rocks makes me a little uneasy, because it does not seem like the consequences of this action have been thought out thoroughly.  For example, what might this do to the marine life that lives around these rocks?  Could this carbon someday escape the rocks and create an even bigger problem than our current carbon problem?  You can find this article here.

-Erica Nickerson

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